"What’s the one thing you would change about the way people think about charity?""The fact that even the smallest donation can help. And it doesn’t matter whether you give to the children’s cancer foundation or someone else, as long as you’re giving. But people forget that, because they see us, and not the people they’re helping. Last week we visited the children that we are supporting, and it helped us empathize a lot more with them. But I wish more people would do that."

"What’s the one thing you would change about the way people think about charity?"
"The fact that even the smallest donation can help. And it doesn’t matter whether you give to the children’s cancer foundation or someone else, as long as you’re giving. But people forget that, because they see us, and not the people they’re helping. Last week we visited the children that we are supporting, and it helped us empathize a lot more with them. But I wish more people would do that."

"Dear HoS,2 years ago I wanted to kill myself. I was depressed, anorexic, but my brother’s words brought me back from my close shave with death. He told me that he had almost killed himself once, but the only reason he stopped was because he didn’t want to die and let ME think that dying is a way out. It isn’t, and I knew he was going to live and show me that there is a way out - and that way isn’t suicide. I just really wanted to let the world know that such a guy exists, and I feel he deserves all the recognition he can get. It would mean the world to me to see this posted up.Thank you!”

"Dear HoS,

2 years ago I wanted to kill myself. I was depressed, anorexic, but my brother’s words brought me back from my close shave with death. He told me that he had almost killed himself once, but the only reason he stopped was because he didn’t want to die and let ME think that dying is a way out. It isn’t, and I knew he was going to live and show me that there is a way out - and that way isn’t suicide. I just really wanted to let the world know that such a guy exists, and I feel he deserves all the recognition he can get. It would mean the world to me to see this posted up.

Thank you!”

Received this a few days back, figured it’s totally worth publishing_Dear HOS,This is a photo of my 2 year old daughter and my boyfriend. My daughter’s biological father decided he didn’t want to support me half way through the pregnancy and gave up after promising that we’d be a happy family and that he would provide, and after she was born I was offered nothing but abuse. When my daughter was 7 months old I met my current partner coincidentally at a friend’s football match and we got talking online straight away, I asked him out a couple of days later and we are here now. From the day he met my daughter he has accepted her as his own and loved, cared for and protected her like a true father. She has now started calling him Daddy without any of our influence. It is the most special thing to see and hear. He is a true blessing in both of our lives and I think he needs so recognition for being such a wonderful person.Thanks,Laura _Of course he does :)

Received this a few days back, figured it’s totally worth publishing
_

Dear HOS,

This is a photo of my 2 year old daughter and my boyfriend. My daughter’s biological father decided he didn’t want to support me half way through the pregnancy and gave up after promising that we’d be a happy family and that he would provide, and after she was born I was offered nothing but abuse. When my daughter was 7 months old I met my current partner coincidentally at a friend’s football match and we got talking online straight away, I asked him out a couple of days later and we are here now. From the day he met my daughter he has accepted her as his own and loved, cared for and protected her like a true father. She has now started calling him Daddy without any of our influence. It is the most special thing to see and hear. He is a true blessing in both of our lives and I think he needs so recognition for being such a wonderful person.

Thanks,
Laura 
_

Of course he does :)

"I’ve been in social work for a long time. The first few months are the hardest though, because you are suddenly hit by stories of children who have gone through neglect, domestic abuse, and sometimes even sexual abuse - when you just don’t expect it in a place like Singapore.""How do you usually find out about them?""Usually through peers or their school; sometimes they tell their teachers. The worst part is when you have to go into their homes and practically take them out and away from their family.""Then what keeps you going?""Knowing that you’ve made a difference?"

"I’ve been in social work for a long time. The first few months are the hardest though, because you are suddenly hit by stories of children who have gone through neglect, domestic abuse, and sometimes even sexual abuse - when you just don’t expect it in a place like Singapore."
"How do you usually find out about them?"
"Usually through peers or their school; sometimes they tell their teachers. The worst part is when you have to go into their homes and practically take them out and away from their family."
"Then what keeps you going?"
"Knowing that you’ve made a difference?"

via one of PinkDot’s excellent speeches, reprinted by permission of Benjamin and son "When I was in secondary school, I was among the fortunate few to have friends who were gay. Some of whom I knew were gay before they knew or cared to admit.My father was most concerned, of course, and told me he was worried that I would get affected or influenced - in his own words, ‘you spend so much time with him, you become a gay then you know’.I said, ‘Pa, look at me, I can’t dress to save my life. I wish I COULD be influenced’.Then came NS, the 2 and a half years that was meant to make men out of boys. Interestingly, it was also where I learned how brave my gay army mates were, and how they stood the tallest among the fighting men in my combat unit. Not only did they endure the physical duress of training, they took the insults - being called Chow Ah Kua, Bapok, Faggot - any derogatory term for a gay man, daily. It was only after my unit became operational that the tables turned somewhat.The best GPMG gunner was gay. Two of my company’s best platoon sergeants were gay, and the guy that broke another soldier’s leg during unarmed combat was one of those Chow Ah Kuas. These NS boys were tortured and I cannot begin to imagine the torment they must have endured, having to hide and deny who they were.Things are every so slightly better these days. There’s this civil event right here that celebrates and affirms the right to love, regardless of orientation, even if some people don’t, and even if there is an unjust and unconstitutional piece of legislation that doesn’t.My hope is that it doesn’t stop here. And I will support the celebration and affirmation until it becomes a right under the laws of this otherwise dynamic country.I saw this because my family and I count ourselves the luckiest people. It’s not because we probably have more gay friends than straight ones. But it’s because many of our gay friends have shown us the ability to sustain love above all manner of obstacles, objection, ridicule.And more importantly, they love my wife, my son, and myself for who they are. We are without doubt blessed by their friendship, and our family cannot do without their love.I am glad that we are raising our son amongst friends who share the same family values. That two people can love each other regardless of gender, gender identity or labeling.If this is the ‘gay lifestyle’, then my family and I will wholeheartedly promote it.”

via one of PinkDot’s excellent speeches, reprinted by permission of Benjamin and son 

"When I was in secondary school, I was among the fortunate few to have friends who were gay. Some of whom I knew were gay before they knew or cared to admit.
My father was most concerned, of course, and told me he was worried that I would get affected or influenced - in his own words, ‘you spend so much time with him, you become a gay then you know’.
I said, ‘Pa, look at me, I can’t dress to save my life. I wish I COULD be influenced’.

Then came NS, the 2 and a half years that was meant to make men out of boys. Interestingly, it was also where I learned how brave my gay army mates were, and how they stood the tallest among the fighting men in my combat unit. Not only did they endure the physical duress of training, they took the insults - being called Chow Ah Kua, Bapok, Faggot - any derogatory term for a gay man, daily. It was only after my unit became operational that the tables turned somewhat.
The best GPMG gunner was gay. Two of my company’s best platoon sergeants were gay, and the guy that broke another soldier’s leg during unarmed combat was one of those Chow Ah Kuas. These NS boys were tortured and I cannot begin to imagine the torment they must have endured, having to hide and deny who they were.

Things are every so slightly better these days. There’s this civil event right here that celebrates and affirms the right to love, regardless of orientation, even if some people don’t, and even if there is an unjust and unconstitutional piece of legislation that doesn’t.
My hope is that it doesn’t stop here. And I will support the celebration and affirmation until it becomes a right under the laws of this otherwise dynamic country.

I saw this because my family and I count ourselves the luckiest people. It’s not because we probably have more gay friends than straight ones. But it’s because many of our gay friends have shown us the ability to sustain love above all manner of obstacles, objection, ridicule.
And more importantly, they love my wife, my son, and myself for who they are. We are without doubt blessed by their friendship, and our family cannot do without their love.

I am glad that we are raising our son amongst friends who share the same family values. That two people can love each other regardless of gender, gender identity or labeling.

If this is the ‘gay lifestyle’, then my family and I will wholeheartedly promote it.”

performancelifearchive asked:

Hey! Great work! Really illuminating read. I was wondering what it is like photographing people in Singapore. I get the impression that many humans here are quite conservative when it comes being in front of the camera. Having a portrait taken by someone else, spontaneously. Is this something you've encountered yourself? How have you overcome it? I suppose what I'm indirectly asking is, what exactly do you ask when you approach people and how many say no to having their photographs taken?

Haha it’s a 70-30 ratio so far. 70% of the people say yes, 30% say no. I guess people are surprised in a positive way more than anything. Most of the times they’re fine having their picture taken and having a conversation with a stranger as long as they’re assured that there’s no odd stuff happening. Body language, lots of smiling, and giving them a card to my page - all these things help!

Anonymous asked:

i really want to meet you, I think we'll have quite the conversation & I'm finally back home till end August!!

Haha let’s set up a meeting then! Drop an email here: humansofsg@gmail.com